People with pets dispose of their deceased animals' remains in different ways, but if they live in the city the options are obviously more limited. Preparation and air shipment are carried out in accordance with the laws of and facilities available in Japan and in some cases, the services fall short of those expected in the U.S. We recommend that you ask the funeral director of your choice to determine the advisability of viewing the remains.
It was this that led Jessica Mitford to write The American Way of Death” in 1963: Odds are that the undertaker will be the arbiter of what is a suitable” funeral…Even if the deceased is the president of the United States.” In an updated edition published posthumously in 1998, Mitford was disappointed at how little had changed: prices had kept rising and undertakers still sold services customers did not know they could refuse or felt too embarrassed to question.



Particularly notorious are mobile dog crematoria that advertise their service for ¥50,000 and then perform the cremation in an incinerator in the back of a truck and demand ¥300,000 because optional” items and tell customer if they pay up the bone of their dog will be broken into little bits.
But in looking at the Japanese way of approaching pet death, death care, and memorial, there is a lovely simplicity to it. As in any culture, pet death care is still growing in acceptance and understanding in Japan, but the solemnity with which they approach it really tugs at my heart.

There is no Japanese law providing that remains must be interred within a certain amount of time. Many also offer pet funerals, where the pet's family can assemble, light incense, offer prayer (from the family as well as from monks), and bid farewell to their beloved pet in a more ritual manner.
To feel attachment to a beloved pet and to pray for its rebirth in the Pure Land or to wish to be buried together are only natural wishes for many Japanese. The other required document, which can often be applied for at the same time as the Death Certificate, is the Certificate of Permission for Burial or Cremation” (Maiso Kaso Kyokasho).
Unfollow japanese urn small to stop getting updates on your eBay Feed. Sometimes clients will find a cremation disc and call, very upset, because their pet did not have a collar, which leads them to surmise that they have the incorrect cremains. This certificate is based on the Japanese death certificate and is valid for use in the United States.

You can also choose from adult, pet japanese cremation urn, as well as from urn japanese cremation urn, and whether japanese cremation urn is metal, wooden, or marble. The latter category is further divided into two types — one in which the whole process is left to the service operator, and the other in which the pet owners themselves pick up the pet bones from the ashes.
Embalmed remains must be transported as cargo, and require processing by the Japanese ground handling company employed by all airlines serving Japan. I would strongly recommend this product to anyone who would ペット 霊園 like a urn to store the ashes of your sweet pet. Some service operators, in cooperation with temples, provide memorial services for pets, such as a Buddhist ritual marking the first anniversary of their death.

Working with a group of pet morticians, AEON offers services in which a pet's body will be transported to a cremation facility, and then either back to the parent's home or to a pet cemetery or memorial site. A survey in 2008 by the Japan Pet Food Association found that 30 percent of Japan's pet dogs are aged 10 or older.
At least three temples offer daily services, including a monk-led ceremony, cremation and sprinkling of ashes in rivers - the symbolic ritual of returning earthly remains to nature. Many of these new funeral homes are started by non-Japanese nationals. A surprising number of Japanese have ferrets for pets.